(from Creative Loafing)
Producer of the Year — When Houston rapper Pimp C said several months before his 2007 death that Atlanta wasn’t really the South, trill folk knew exactly what he was talm ‘bout. Truth is A-Town hip-hop hasn’t had a distinct or truly identifiable Southern sound on the production tip since Organized Noize laid down its Dungeon Family blueprint (OutKast, Society of Soul, Goodie Mob, Witchdoctor, Cool Breeze) in the mid-’90s. Which is why the July release of DJ Burn One’s instrumental mixtapeThe Ashtray struck such a chord. It was as if he and his Five Points production company had unearthed the frequency of Georgia red clay itself. With a retro-futuristic vibe that meshes the country twang of guitar licks and the ghetto knock of 808s with bluesy, hypnotic bass lines and dirty church organs, The Ashtray sounds a clarion call for the rebirth of riding music, fueled by inner-city struggle and a stiff shot of Southern comfort. — RC

(from Creative Loafing)

Producer of the Year — When Houston rapper Pimp C said several months before his 2007 death that Atlanta wasn’t really the South, trill folk knew exactly what he was talm ‘bout. Truth is A-Town hip-hop hasn’t had a distinct or truly identifiable Southern sound on the production tip since Organized Noize laid down its Dungeon Family blueprint (OutKast, Society of Soul, Goodie Mob, Witchdoctor, Cool Breeze) in the mid-’90s. Which is why the July release of DJ Burn One’s instrumental mixtapeThe Ashtray struck such a chord. It was as if he and his Five Points production company had unearthed the frequency of Georgia red clay itself. With a retro-futuristic vibe that meshes the country twang of guitar licks and the ghetto knock of 808s with bluesy, hypnotic bass lines and dirty church organs, The Ashtray sounds a clarion call for the rebirth of riding music, fueled by inner-city struggle and a stiff shot of Southern comfort. — RC

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